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Case Study - Coca Cola


Coca Cola has always been able to find amazingly unique and innovative ways to bring their consumers into the mix. Engaging campaigns such as their “Happiness Machine”(Moye 2013) - where vending machines dispensed flowers, candy or hugs - always found a way into our hearts, but more importantly into our minds. This sly marketing was not only memorable, but generated a lovely emotional response to the brand through its “acts of kindness”. However, this wasn’t the first campaign to call upon warm and fuzzy feelings. Coke has been using the act of bringing people together as one of their claims to fame, for years now. That is why they boast that their customers’ opinion of them has not declined in any country (Customer Satisfaction).

Very few of us could probably remember when Coca Cola was just an average beverage company. They were able to establish themselves above the competition quite easily, soon after John Pemberton invented the world famous beverage. It all goes back to their customer-based approach to market research, as opposed to product research(DeVault). Because of the loyalty they have built, Coca Cola has been able to experiment with their branding to further their marketing success, and though they would love to attribute their success to beautiful designs and appealing branding aesthetics, it is really the appeal to the basic human emotions of love and togetherness that have brought the multitudes to Coca Cola. Now people in more than 200 countries drink 1.9 billion servings every day (Feloni).

Over the years, Coca Cola has faced its fair share of obstacles. When they first began marketing in 1886, Coca Cola was an elixir that was mixed with both alcohol and cocaine. Shortly after that, Prohibition forced Coca Cola to create a version of its drink that was free of all mind-altering substances - much to the dismay of their original fans (Feloni). There was also a moment in time where Coca Cola tried to change their original recipe to create “New Coke”, in 1985. This turned out to be quite a failure among its audience, so they apologized and returned to their roots.

Even from the beginning, Coca Cola established itself as a brand that held more worth than their competitors. As a strategy in the very beginning, the company marketed that their special beverage should never be served above 40 degrees and that, in fact, 36 degrees would be the ideal temperature to consume their drink. This marketing strategy created an air of sophistication in relation to Coca Cola, and putting a distinction on their brand compared to the competitors.

There is a lot to be learned from Coca Cola and how they center their marketing around their clients. Their company has been able to maintain a timeless appeal, and consistently delicious products. However, it is always their customers who come first. With this focus, combined with their innovative marketing campaigns and strategy, Coca Cola has become one of the most recognized and steadily popular brands in the world.

Resources

Customer Satisfaction. [Digital Article]. Retrieved on November 7th, 2017 from https://coca-colahellenic.com/en/operations/sales-and-customers/customer-satisfaction/ .

DeVault, G. Brand Loyalty Case Study Coca Cola Can Change-Up. [Digital Article]. Published on September 20th, 2016. Retrieved on November 7th, 2017 from https://www.thebalance.com/brand-loyalty-case-study-coca-cola-can-change-up-2296830 .

Feloni, R. 7 strategies Coca-Cola used to become one of the world's most recognizable brands.

[Digital Article]. Retrieved on November 7th, 2017 from http://www.businessinsider.com/strategies-coca-cola-used-to-become-an-iconic-brand-2016-2/#1-it-started-with-a-unique-market-tested-formula-1 .

Moye, J. Dispensing Happiness: 12 Innovative Coca-Cola Vending Machines in Action.

[Digital Article]. Published, December 3rd, 2013. Retrieved on November 7th, 2017 from http://www.coca-colacompany.com/stories/dispensing-happiness-12-innovative-coca-cola-vending-machines-in-action .

Stocker, M. How Coca Cola and Yoplait use “Customer Participation” marketing - and how you can too. [Digital Article]. Retrieved on November 7th, 2017 from https://blog.marketo.com/2014/09/how-coca-cola-and-yoplait-use-customer-participation-marketing-and-how-you-can-too.html .


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